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Gran Turismo 7: How To Obtain The International-A License

Gran Turismo 7 has brought back the classic license system and, as some sections will be blocked off until you complete them, it's a good idea to go through them all as early as possible. The International A is the fourth one to complete and, even including the upcoming Super License, is probably the hardest and might result in you wanting to hurl the controller at the TV – so watch yourselves out there.

Completing the licenses rewards you with credits and a new car (potentially two new cars if you achieve gold in them all). The cars for the International-A license are the Toyota 86 Group B Rally Car if you pass them all, and be prepared to be underwhelmed by the Alpine A110 '17 if you get all golds.

International A License Lessons

Lesson Tips On How To Complete Car Used
IA- Racing Line: Expert We start off fairly easily with the first corner at Suzuka – a right-hand hairpin that gets tighter on exit. Don't brake too early here, otherwise, you'll lose a considerable amount of time that you won't be able to make up through the corner. The Aston also understeers a bit, throttle control is key. Aston Martin DB11
IA-2 Consecutive Corners: Expert 1 This is a difficult one. Any wall taps mean instant disqualification and, as the Lambo is a real handful, this means you have to be gentle with the steering as possible. Your racing line must also be absolutely on point for the hairpin, as scrubbed speed here will be impossible to make up. Lamborghini Diablo GT
IA-3 Dirt Driving: Expert Another rally lesson, and it is a right hassle. This tight sequence of corners means that you must master sliding with the handbrake in order to make up the time. However, this will take several attempts to get right if you are using just a controller. If you are only worried about passing the test (rather than getting gold), then you should be able to just brake normally as if you were on an asphalt track and take the corners. You will be able to just about make the time doing this. Ford Focus Rally Car
IA-4 Consecutive Corners: Expert 2 After the last lesson, this one will feel like a walk in the park. While the Testarossa is a handful and prone to oversteer (especially as you exit the penultimate corner), this lesson will be simple enough with good throttle control. Ferrari Testarossa
IA – 5 Consecutive Corners: Expert 3 This is a series of famous corners at Le Mans called the Porsche Curves and you are in a famously powerful car: the Nissan R92. The trick with short sweeping chicanes like this is to drive in a straight line while scrubbing off as little speed as possible. The Nissan will bite you if you are too heavy on the steering, so you need to be as smooth as you can. Nissan 92CP
IA-6 Corners with Elevation Changes 2 This is another famous corner: the Corkscrew at Laguna Seca. The Viper isn't the world's greatest handling car, so this one can be quite tricky. The Corkscrew itself is completely blind on entry, so ensure you don't cut it by treating it as you would any other chicane. The little right-handed kink before the Corkscrew is also blind and needs a perfect braking zone. Dodge Viper GTS
IA-7 Cornering In The Wet – Expert This is actually a fairly simple one because the Alpine doesn't have masses amounts of torque, it is okay for driving in the wet. The only tricky bit is the final hairpin, which is very easy to understeer as the track is narrow. Alpine A110
IA-8 Tricky Consecutive Corners 1 This one requires an extremely smooth racing line, as there's almost no straight section for you to make up time. Watch your throttle on the final bend, as you'll lose time dramatically if you have to brake to stay on the track. Toyota GR Supra
IA-9: Tricky Consecutive Corners 2 This is a very twisty section that will, again, require a perfect racing line to get right. The Megane is a great handling car, with excellent brakes, fortunately – this one should be fairly simple. Watch out for the undulations when braking and turning, as you can easily be thrown out of the corner by them. Toyota GR Supra
IA-10 Applying The Racing Line This is a hard final exam that dumps you straight into the post-Karrusell section at the Nurbergring. The first corner is blind and is tighter than it first looks, so it's very easy to fail and hit the barrier before you've even realized you've started. Don't brake too early for the corners; the Mercedes has brakes so good they are almost racing brakes, so you don't need to, and you'll lose masses of time doing this. Finally, you might want to lay off the kerbs, as they are high on the Nordschleife and can throw you off course. Racing line. Braking zones. Perfection. Mercedes-AMG GT R

If you are new to racing games or motor-racing in general, you'll notice as you go through this license that the actual race cars (like the Renault Megane) handle much, much better than the road cars. This is because in real life they have been built to take corners as fast as possible, and that feature is replicated here in GT7. It's important to understand this if you are selecting a car for other races in the game, as some road cars will have a higher top speed than the racing cars – but the racing cars will beat them every time.

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